San Francisco Writers Conference

While attending the San Francisco Writers Conference last week, I went out to Treasure Island with my partner to show her the view of The City. Unfortunately, the entire length of the Avenue of the Palms was closed, and a high fence put up along the shore to obscure the view. It looks like the tear-down to create plush condos is proceeding with the vengeance of a Real Estate Mogul.

The story of the ride to this shot is worth sharing.

While in conversation with my cabbie, he said he was Filipino, and had arrived in The City in 1972 (the same time I left to join the USS Holland). He mentioned his rent for an apartment at the time was $400/month. I can attest to having to move to Hayward to afford the same sized apartment for $180.
Given the cost, and his challenging situation (looking for work to pay that cost), I asked why he moved here?
“It’s my home.”
“I thought you said you were born in the PI?”
“I was, and so was my father, but grandfather was an Army Cavalry man who fought in the insurrection (still going on, by the way). “Grandfather was a Buffalo Soldier.”

This brought me deep satisfaction to have heard his personal story of connection.

Listening At The Bottom Of The Ocean

Individual Naval Facilities for monitoring ocean traffic approaching the United States.

source: United States Navy

This map displays SOSUS Atlantic listening stations lining the continental shelf of the United States.

Their mission was to detect and track submarines in the Atlantic ocean.

This was accomplished through a distributed underwater network of angle sensitive audio sensors. These directional microphones are connected at the end of a many miles long submarine cable out to the continental shelf that drops thousands of feet to the ocean floor.  (The white coloring in the relief map reveals the shelf face feature.)

The SOSUS listening stations are located on coastal land.  Their underwater hydrophone sensors are many miles out at sea (80 miles or more), and often half a mile deep in the ocean’s bottom or on the edge of the shelf (or island’s seamount in the case of Bermuda).

“The Snake,” by John Steinbeck

Descriptive Paragraph:

It was almost dark when young Dr. Phillips swung his sack to his shoulder and left the tide pool.  He climbed over the rocks and squashed along the street in his rubber boots.  The street lights were on by the time he arrived at his little commercial laboratory on the cannery street of Monterey.  It was a tight little building, standing partly on piers over the bay water and partly on land.  On both sides the big corrugated-iron sardine canneries crowded in on it.

(My mentor Howard Pease continues) Here the setting shows the protagonist as part of his environment.  A further step gives us his name, and we learn that he is young.  By implication we gather that Dr.  Phillips is not a medical man but a scientist who runs a commercial laboratory on cannery row; therefore, he is no doubt a marine biologist.

Notice that he is in action.  We glimpse the tide pool and the rocks on the beach.  We do not see the town itself until the protagonist arrives at his laboratory.  The time element is mentioned twice, but not by clock.  This gives the impression that Dr. Phillips is a man who works until it is too dark to see.  Notice, too, the active verbs climb and squash, both used without adverbs.

“Samson and Delilah,” by D. H. Lawrence

Descriptive Paragraph:

A man got down from the motor-omnibus that runs from Penzance to St. Just-in-Penwith, and turned northwards, up-hill towards the Polestar.  It was only half-past six, but already the stars were out, a cold little wind was blowing from the sea, and the crystalline, three-pulse flash of the lighthouse below the cliffs beat rhythmically in the first darkness.

(My mentor Howard Pease continues) In this opening paragraph the author has added a new element, the protagonist, though the man is not named.  We see him walking in the early evening along the coast of Cornwall, and the description of the setting might have been seen through his eyes.  Since readers are more interested in people than in Setting, this paragraph is more apt to catch attention.

“The Gold of Troy,” by Robert Payne

Opening Paragraph:

During the seventies and eighties of the last century an old gray-haired scholar, wearing a high collar and a sun helmet, was to be seen wandering over the ruins of an obscure mound in Asia Minor.  He was short and wiry, with dark brown eyes, high cheekbones, a heavy nose, and a sensual mouth; there was something of the peasant about him, something too of the Lubeck merchants who were  his ancestors.  He spoke in a high-pitched voice, dressed shabbily, walked with a curious gliding motion, and always carried in his coat pocket a dog-eared paper-bound edition of the Iliad or the Odyssey.  To the friendly inquirer he would explain that he had uncovered the ancient city of Troy and found in its walls a secret treasure hoard of gold, which he kept securely locked in his house in Athens.  He believed that the ashes of Odysseus, the crown jewels of the Trojan Empire, and the golden death masks of Agamemnon and many  other Greek heroes were in his possession, and it is just possible that his claims were justified.  Until he was long past middle age he never touched a spade, but during the last seventeen years of his life he excavated continually.  The most unscientific of archeologists, he founded the modern science of archeology.

(My mentor Howard Pease continues) Let me note here that this biography won critical acclaim as well as a place on best-seller lists.  Best sellers, good, bad, or indifferent, usually have one thing in common: they have a mass appeal; that is, the average reader finds them interesting enough to recommend them to friends.

It is at once evident that this is not a jazzed-up biographical novel based on more imagination than facts.  The opening paragraph, long and detailed, gives the impression that here is a book based on good, solid material.  The author presents his protagonist in an interesting way.  The mention of Odysseus, the crown jewels of the Trojan Empire and the death masks of Agamemnon echo in our minds like the opening bars of a song remembered from our childhood.  The author captures our attention and succeeds in luring us on to read further.

“Miriam,” by Truman Capote

Opening Paragraph:

For several years, Mrs. H. T. Miller had lived alone in a pleasant apartment (two rooms with kitchenette) in a remodeled brownstone near the East River.  She was a widow: Mr. H. T. Miller had left a reasonable amount of insurance.  Her interests were narrow, she had no friends to speak of, and she rarely journeyed farther than the corner grocery.  The other people in the house never seemed to notice her: her clothes were matter-of-fact, her hair iron-gray, clipped and casually waved; she did not use cosmetics, her features were plain and inconspicuous, and on her last birthday she was sixty-one.  Her activities were seldom spontaneous: she kept the two rooms immaculate, smoked an occasional cigarette, prepared her own meals and tended a canary.

Then she met Miriam.  It was snowing that night.  Mrs. Miller had finished drying the dishes.…

(My mentor Howard Pease continues) Notice the matter-of-fact prose which introduces the protagonist.  Mrs. Miller is an ordinary person; she might be any aging widow living alone.  Notice, too, that the second paragraph starts the story, the action.  From beginning to end, the prose is keyed to the first paragraph.  But the story itself is far from ordinary.  The interest slowly rises to a smashing climax in the final paragraph, an ending you’ll not forget.

Windows 10 Update Failure and its Recovery

You have arrived at this post because you searched for one of the following problems:

 Microsoft.Windows.ShellExperienceHost … needs to be installed correctly

or

Error Code 0xC1900200 – 0x20008 (Code 0xC1900202 – 0x20008)

or

Windows 10 upgrade couldn’t update the system reserved partition

or

Your computer is not compatible with Windows10 (the supremely bitter irony when you are updating it)

or ….

If you share the same problem I struggled with for a week, then the resolution could be quite simple.  It requires a tool downloaded from the net, some adjustments of your disk’s partition table, and (yet one more attempt to) update/upgrade.

What follows is not for the faint of heart, but it is within the skill set of any tinkerer.  By that, I mean you know the risks; but if you don’t perform backups of your data–you don’t qualify, and I suggest you back away from this page right now.

Through considerable Googling of the terms above, I found a tool called MiniTool Partition Wizard Free reviewed on PCMag.  There’s your resource for fixing (knock wood) the problem that brought you here.

The necessary operation is to take the OS partition (typically called C:) resize it a bit smaller (be generous, reduce it by at least double the size of the current system reserve partition) and then extend the system reserved partition to make it bigger.  The MiniTool (free version) will let you change the edges of a partition.  Do this at the point where they both neighbor each other.  My situation had the system reserve lined up ahead of C: in the partition table.  If your situation varies from my description, re-read everything for my intention.

FIRST: take memory off from the beginning of C: (this is what I did), and

SECOND: add the same amount of memory to the system reserve’s end.

THIRD: press the button on MiniTool to commit the change.

This rescued me from the useless, repetitive, unproductive efforts of Windows to self diagnose (it never had a clue), and correct the problem (that never was going to happen, this had been going on for every update for a year).

Novel Preview In Kindle Reader Technical Requirements

If you wish to be a reviewer of an unpublished novel of mine, there are several technical requirements you must meet to view my novel in a Kindle reader.  For correspondence, use publisher at this domain.

  1. You must send me your Kindle email address:
    To find your Send-to-Kindle e-mail address, visit the Manage your Devices page at Manage Your Kindle.
  2. You must put my email address in your Kindle account white-list:
    I can only send to your Kindle devices or apps from e-mail accounts that you added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List. To add my e-mail account, visit the Personal Document Settings page at Manage Your Kindle.